Unique Weir Installation

I am glad to be getting measuring devices and data loggers installed – it is enjoyable work and diverters are getting peace of mind.  All of my work is confidential so clients’ names won’t be mentioned without permission.  That being said, a few projects can be discussed here.

This is a unique weir installation – it is doing two things at once.  Two 4′ wide weirs are side by side, set on a leveled, compacted base of 3/4″ minus road base.

First, it has a splitter built in as part of the weir – see the low wall behind me.  Two water rights are precisely split inside the weir itself so each user gets the correct amount.

Second, it is a double weir.  The ditch has low banks, but around 10 cfs needs to be accurately measured.  Weirs ideally pass a maximum of 1 cfs per foot of width, so this exceeds that by 25%, while still keeping the water inside the ditch.  So, why use weirs instead of a flume, which can pass much more flow per foot of width?  Weirs are better understood in this area, the ditch has adequate width, and it makes splitting the flows easier.

A plate metal wall splits the 2 weirs into 3.  Board slots were added with angle iron…you can guess from the photo that the iron lengths had to be cut down a bit for a 1-board, 2″ x 12″ weir.

 

 

Board slots had to be bolted on both sides of the plate steel.  My friend Bob, owner of B & J Welding & Machine, Inc. in Anderson, cut, welded and drilled the plate steel wall.

A water level logger sits at the back of the shared weir walls, and records hourly water levels 24 x 7 x 365.  Vandalism is a concern so the logger is locked up, and only the owner and I can get in.

1/4″ thick plate metal wingwalls upstream and downstream protect against flow working its way around the sides.  The wingwalls add stability, keeping the weirs from tipping sideways or tilting up- or downstream.

The final result is s solid, long-lasting installation that meets the requirements of SB 88!

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